Copy-Right.org
Course Packs

TermCourse Packs
CategoryLicensing Clauses
DefinitionRefers to the use of Licensed Materials for course packs. This term when negotiated specifically in the license agreement refers to the licensor^s agreement that the product can be used for course packs.
SampleNo sample for this term available

Additional web pages related to 'licensing clauses':

  • Fair Use
  • ILL (Usable for InterLibrary Loan)
  • Perpetual Access (Perpetual Rights)
  • Archiving Rights
  • Linking to and from Content
  • ADA Compliance
  • Confidentiality of User Information
  • Completeness of Content
  • Anti-UCITA Clause
  • Governing Law
  • Continuous Use Down Time

    Facts on copyright

    • This statute first accorded exclusive rights to authors rather than publishers, and it included protections for consumers of printed work ensuring that publishers could not control their use after sale.
    • Once the term of a copyright has expired, the formerly copyrighted work enters the public domain and may be freely used or exploited by anyone, as courts in the United States and the United Kingdom have rejected the doctrine of a common law copyright. Public domain works should not be confused with works that are publically available. It is completely incorrect, for instance, that simply posting material on the Internet places the material into the public domain such that anyone can freely copy, adapt or commercially exploit the work. Apart from anything else, the material may have been posted by someone who had no right to do so, let alone the power to waive copyright.
    • The American exclusive rights tradition is inconsistent with the notion of moral rights as it was constituted in the Civil Code tradition stemming from France's revolution. In the United States, exclusive rights are statutory and granted by Congress. The first major copyright case in the United States, Wheaton v. Peters, established that copyright was not a natural right or a common law right. Although the case was later nullified when the Supreme Court declared it null and void, it soon became a symbol for the morality of copyright. When the United States signed the Berne Convention, they stipulated that the Convention's "moral rights" provisions were addressed sufficiently by other statutes, such as laws covering libel and slander. In most of Europe it is not possible for authors to assign their moral rights (unlike the copyright itself, which is regarded as an item of property which can be sold, licensed, lent, mortgaged or given like any other property).

    This site is growing and will contain information like copyright lawsuit, copyright protection and copyright law.