Copy-Right.org
Coverage (Electronic Holdings?)

TermCoverage (Electronic Holdings?)
CategoryDescriptive Elements
DefinitionRefers to the extent of material that is made electronically available.
SampleNo sample for this term available

Additional web pages related to 'descriptive elements':

  • Electronic Resource (eResource)
  • Electronic Title (eTitle)
  • Print Title
  • Electronic Resource Package (eResource Package)
  • Format

    Facts on copyright

    • Copyright (international symbol: ) is a set of exclusive rights granted by governments to regulate the use of a particular expression of an idea or information. At its most general, it is literally "the right to copy" an original creation. In most cases, these rights are of limited duration.
    • No action may be brought under this title alleging infringement of copyright based on the manufacture, importation, or distribution of a digital audio recording device, a digital audio recording medium, an analog recording device, or an analog recording medium, or based on the noncommercial use by a consumer of such a device or medium for making digital musical recordings or analog musical recordings. Later acts amended US Copyright law so that making 10 copies or more is considered commercial, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act effectively permits DRM (Digital Rights/Restrictions Management) to prevent manufacture, importation, or distribution of recording devices if the device bypasses an access or copy control.
    • Two major developments in the 14th and 15th centuries seem to have provoked the development of modern copyright. First, the expansion of mercantilist trade in major European cities and the appearance of the secular university helped produce an educated bourgeois class interested in the information of the day. This helped spur the emergence of a "public sphere," which was increasingly served by entrepreneurial "stationers" who would produce copies of books on demand. Second, Gutenberg's development of movable type and the development and spread of the printing press made mass reproduction of printed works quick and cheap. Before these two developments, the process of copying a work could be nearly as labor intensive and expensive as creating the original, and was largely relegated to monastic scribes.

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